Fees & Insurance

 

I understand the pain of sticker shock and I know how expensive therapy can seem.  I also know that you, your wellbeing, and your mental health are priceless.

In all of my work with you, I strive for honesty and openness.  I know that seeking therapy can be anxiety-provoking and I want finances to be one less thing you are wondering about.

Information about my fees, insurance, and my policy regarding missed appointments, can be found below.

Fees:

  • Individual Therapy or Parent Coaching 50 minute session:  $130
  • Couples Therapy or Couples Parent Coaching 50 minute session: $140
  • Extended 75 minute Individual, Couples, or Parent Coaching session:  $155
  • Extended 90 minute Individual, Couples, or Parent Coaching session: $170

Let’s Talk about Insurance …

I am an Out of Network provider, meaning I do not contract with health insurance companies.  If you are eligible for out of network benefits, you may be able to be reimbursed for my services from your health insurance.

If you’ve come this far and are super bummed about this news – I get it.  I put a lot of thought into this decision and I want to be transparent about why I’ve chosen not to contract with insurance:

Privacy & Confidentiality

Managed care companies often use utilization review professionals and gatekeepers who would request that I share your personal and confidential matters with them.  This opens up a floodgate where it’s possible that countless other people in their company could have access to your personal information.  I do not believe this practice supports your wellbeing.  In addition, the process of informing managed care companies about your progress takes time, which often leads to therapy being interrupted while we wait for their response.

Conflicts of Interest

I became a therapist because I was born with what seems to be an extra dose of caring and concern – I really want to help people.  In short, your wellbeing is my priority.  The problem is that Managed Care Companies often have opposite priorities: to reduce their company’s costs while raising their own profits.  They fail to see their clients as actual humans with real pain and issues, so they aren’t very focused on making decisions that will lead to a higher quality of care or quality of life for their clients.  What it boils down to is that Managed Care Companies and therapists have opposing views on many important therapeutic issues, meaning we have a conflict of interest.  As a Licensed Professional Counselor candidate, I am required by my board of ethics to avoid potential conflicts of interest.

Restricted Choice

Managed care companies are usually in the driver’s seat for your therapy – meaning they often only recommend therapists who offer short-term/brief therapy because for them, less sessions = less money.  This is obviously true, but it is also generally true that less sessions = less progress.  While I don’t advocate that you be in therapy for years on end, it is likely that you’ll need more than a few sessions to have a positive therapeutic experience that produces positive change and growth.  Further, managed care companies can actually restrict what is discussed in therapy, decide on how long you can see a therapist, and dictate what types of therapies are allowed.  What’s even crazier, is that some managed care companies have even included “gag clauses” in their contracts to prevent therapists from suggesting more effective treatments.  Again, my bottom line is your wellbeing and progress – not the managed care company’s bottom line.

Medication

Research shows that medication that is aimed at altering mood is most effective when combined with psychotherapy.  Unfortunately, managed care companies’ decisions often go against this research by approving only medication rather than also approving clients to work with mental health counselors.  Again, managed care companies’ main concern is their own financial bottom line while my priority is your wellbeing.

Diagnosis & Stigma

Managed care companies typically cover services deemed medically necessary.  Often they see through a lens that asks if your situation is literally a life and death situation and if so, treats your psychotherapy as the treatment of illness.  For you, this means you’re required to have a diagnosis of mental illness to be treated by a therapist working with managed care companies.  While this certainly works for some clients, for many, they would prefer not to have that diagnosis and stigma attached to their name.

Additionally, this viewpoint goes against my belief that therapy can be beneficial even when not in times of crisis.  For example, I view it as a sign of extreme strength  to seek counseling for personal goals.  I believe one can improve their quality of life through examining their communication patterns, family dynamics, coping skills, and self-care.  The hard work of growth almost always leads to deepened relationships with others and yourself.  This then positions therapy as a means of prevention, rather than survival.